Legislative Commentary. Sorry, Not My Usual Thing, But This Deserves an Exception

As promised in yesterday’s post about medical marijuana, and with permission, I’m posting the testimony of my friend Victoria Grancarich. This testimoney will be given before Minnesota lawmakers this September. Victoria’s circumstances are very different from mine, as her son’s place on the spectrum is far from Martin’s. But this epidemic is all one spectrum. We stand in solidarity with each other, and root for what helps any child.

Victoria’s 14-year-old so, Julian, is profoundly affected by autism. Victoria and her husband, John, have truly scoured the ends of the Earth to help Julian and have made progress healing his mind and body. Nevertheless, several years Julian threw himself from a balcony, breaking his back and both his legs. With the onset of puberty, Julian’s self-injurious behavior escalated to the point that he needed constant restraints and protective gear to avoid beating himself into concussions. Victoria and John believe medical cannabis saved their son’s life. As a friend and observer, I agree. In my opinion, to deny marijuana to Julian would be abuse. Yet, this medication was available under Minnesota law only because Julian also suffers from seizures; if he suffered from self-injurious autism but not seizures, the marijuana option would be unavailable. Victoria offers her testimony in an effort to have the law changed and make medical cannabis available to all Minnesotans in need.

My name is Victoria Grancarich. I’m the mother of a 14-year-old boy named Julian. Julian has severe Autism and a seizure disorder. Julian began having seizures in June of 2011. We have tried many medications over the last six years; however, seizures and motor tics continued to be an issue.

Julian had always been a kind and affectionate boy in his younger years. When Julian turned 13, the onset of puberty brought new challenges. In February of 2016 Julian became extremely violent toward both family and school staff. He began raging daily and would physically attack us. It got to the point where we as his family needed to wear protective clothing to avoid being bitten, having our hair pulled, and being kicked and punched. His younger sister could not be in the same room, and she had to spend all of her time at home locked in her room for her own protection.

In August 2016, Julian began to turn the violence on to himself. He began punching himself in the head full force thousands of times per day. He would use his knee to injure his teeth. He would bang his head into walls. We were powerless to stop him. We were trying to protect him using helmets and arm immobilizers, and at times we had to physically restrain him for hours at a time to keep him from harming himself. We believed our son was in terrible pain and was suffering from debilitating headaches. We saw this once vibrant boy lose his will to live. He seemed determined to end his life and came close several times. Between October 2016 and January 2017, Julian was hospitalized three times. He suffered self-inflicted skull fractures and massive tissue damage. He had black eyes and giant hematomas on his skull regularly. The hospital staff offered psychiatric medications as well as gabapentin but nothing could stop the daily rages that lasted every moment that he was awake. I felt certain that if we could not get Julian cannabis that he would find a way to end his life.

Julian qualified for cannabis through the state program because of his seizure disorder. After being sent home from Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis after another life threatening episode of self-injury with no plan in place to heal our son, we felt cannabis was our only hope. The excruciating pain our son was in was getting worse and we knew no pharmaceutical medication could help him. We had tried everything the doctors offered and had absolutely no success.

We enrolled him in the Minnesota Cannabis program in January 2017. Within a week of beginning cannabis therapy Julian was able to go about an hour without harming himself. As the weeks went on and we reached a therapeutic dose Julian’s behaviors began to slowly melt away. By early March he was smiling again. Within six weeks of beginning cannabis Julian was no longer injuring himself or others. He began to take an interest in his life again. He returned to school full time. We were able to remove his helmets and protective gear. By mid-March we were getting smiles and hugs. Julian began to go outdoors again by mid-April. By May Julian began to show interest in using augmentative communication for the first time in his life.

It is now late June. We have not seen one episode of self-injury since early March. Julian has not struck me since February. Julian is enrolled in a day camp for children with special needs where he spends eight hours a day. He is exploring outside and making friends. He is happy and smiling. Julian and his sister have a relationship once again. Julian spends hours in our back yard enjoying bouncing on his trampoline, moving his body and taking in fresh air. He lives safely and happily in our home. He is free from pain. His seizures and motor tics are well managed to the point they are not interfering in his daily life.

Cannabis gave us our beautiful son back. Julian Grancarich is alive and well today because of this miracle medication.

4 thoughts on “Legislative Commentary. Sorry, Not My Usual Thing, But This Deserves an Exception

  1. Very interesting post. Given there is not enough research on long term outcomes/ negative effects (and with a young non extreme case like Martin) at the end of the day its a risk probability assessment question, as you kmow. How much are we willing to risk for the possibility of a more positive outcome.
    I have a kid with ASD myself, and I wonder how much is all my “trying to change him”by restricting the foods he can eat, theraphy sessions and other treatments affecting his self esteem, self worth and possibly also increasing anxiety (the irony).
    Most importantly, in regards to the mm solution as a bridge option I also wonder how will your med team be able to accurately assess that they are correctly treating the underlying cause of anxiety if the symptoms are being managed externally by mm.

    • On the topic of how much “trying to change him” affects self-esteem and self-worth, could I direct you to this post?: https://findingmykid.com/2014/12/15/for-diana/. I think that’s where I cover that topic in the most depth. Regarding whether mm will preclude accurate assessment of underlying causes, that is why I checked repeatedly with Martin’s California doctor, to make sure that we wouldn’t inadvertently impede her work. She doesn’t believe so.

      • Thanks so much for sharing that link on the prior discussion on the subject. Its quite interesting and reasuring. I’m also seeking biomed and have seen significant progress on my own child since we started to embrace some of its principles. There is a part of me that wants to believe in the full recovery and another one that is still skeptical and makes me doubt at times on how far to go on all of this. I wish I would have personally met kids that have fully recovered like you did. I personally think you are doing an absolutely amazing job and Martin is recovering thanks to both of your hard work.
        As a side note. I think mm is a better option than those synthetic drugs that so many doctors prescribe nowadays. Wishing you both the best on that journey and a wonderful time in Nicaragua!

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